Hometown Highlight: Amarillo Junior Achievement

As a community bank, giving back to the community is one of FirstCapital Bank’s top priorities. We believe that by investing in today's communities, we can help builder stronger and brighter futures for generations to come. One way we do this is through partnering with other local businesses and organizations, such as the Junior Achievement in Amarillo, Texas.As a community bank, giving back to the community is one of FirstCapital Bank’s top priorities. We believe that by investing in today's communities, we can help builder stronger and brighter futures for generations to come. One way we do this is through partnering with other local businesses and organizations, such as the Junior Achievement in Amarillo, Texas.

Founded nationally by a group of bankers in 1919, Junior Achievement was introduced to the Amarillo community in 2008 as the need for high school financial literacy courses was on the rise. To help meet this need, the Junior Achievement Amarillo Chapter chose to partner with the Amarillo Independent School District (AISD), carrying out Junior Achievement's mission to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy."

Providing financial courses for students in kindergarten - 12th grade, Junior Achievement programs encourage work-readiness, entrepreneurship, financial literacy skills and experiential learning to inspire young student to one day involve themselves in their local communities and businesses. In Amarillo, Junior Achievement has worked with AISD to specifically focus on grades 2nd, 5th and 7th and high school economic classes.

"Our volunteers are what I deem ‘our special force’," said Teresa Hillman, Amarillo Junior Achievement Executive Director. "We call them ‘volunteers,’ but what they really are, are mentors for our students. We get business professional volunteers to go into the classroom and teach our programs and they’re really what make the programs effective. Our programs are great by themselves, but the special piece is the volunteer because they share their story on what it took for them to get where they are in their career. Or if they are comfortable sharing their own financial experience such as, ‘I ran up a credit card’ they help make the lessons more relatable and more real world."

Lessons are based on grade levels and include topics such as: how a city runs, taxes, budgeting, personal finance, how to manage money, how businesses work together, career success and resume building.

While the curriculum focuses on financial themes, Hillman said volunteers are not required to work in the financial/banking industry; but they do ask volunteers to be business professionals.

For more information about Junior Achievement in Amarillo or to learn more about volunteering through Junior Achievement, please visit their website by clicking here